Rural Crime in Australia

The majority of Australian criminological scholarship is focused on crime and criminal justice in
urban settings; however, rural criminology is an important and growing area of work highlighting the
unique issues surrounding crime, disorder, and criminal justice in non-urban settings. This half-day
symposium will bring the perspectives of researchers, law enforcement, and community members
together in a dialogue about rural crime, policing and disorder. Specifically, three speakers,
representing academic, industry and community perspectives respectively, will examine the ways in
which locational factors, particular to rural and regional settings, impact upon crime and policing in
rural communities. First, Dr. Alistair Harkness will present a key-note address on his work on rural
crime in the Australian context. This will be followed by an industry focused talk given by Inspector
Cameron Whiteside, co-ordinator of the NSW Rural Crime Police Force. Finally, a community
representative (to be determined) will conclude the discussion.

We will encourage attendance from academics, undergraduate, honours and postgraduate students.
Moreover, in addition to the wider academic community, industry professionals working on issues
related to crime and disorder in rural and regional contexts in Australia, as well as community
members will be invited to attend the event. The presentations will be followed by an opportunity
for a roundtable discussion over morning/afternoon tea where presenters, academics, industry
professionals, students and the community can network and discuss current issues in rural crime.

The symposium has the following aims:
– To bring together academics and industry in an effort to develop a research-led and
experientially informed understanding of crime and policing in rural communities
– To expose students to leading researchers, industry leaders and key issues in rural
criminology
– To engage with the community and its leaders on issues of rural crime from which
academics, industry and the community alike may learn
– To build/promote criminology in Australia and New Zealand, with particular attention to
rural/regional crime.

Who is the target audience: Academic community, Industry professionals, and post-graduate
students working on rural crime issues.